Publicity photos

Questions to Christian

Actor and director of My Dog's Got No Nose, Christian Jull, answers a series of questions about the show.

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Why did you choose to put on this show?

Why did you choose to put on this show?

The RStC has not staged a show for over three years and really needed to. However, the playing field has changed dramatically. Primarily, our regular members have other commitments. So I needed to find a show that required the commitment and reliance of as few people as possible. My first criterion was finding a two-act one-man show. The preference was a comedy, but a drama was also fine. This show ticked all of those boxes. Although the play is about a stand-up comedian, his actual comedy gig isn’t the story. It’s about why and how he’s doing it. It’s about the trials and tribulations of getting there. It’s about much, much more. There’s a lot going on that isn’t immediately obvious.

What kind of emotions do you expect / hope to arouse among the audience during the performances?

What kind of emotions do you expect / hope to arouse among the audience during the performances?

This is a great question. I suspect that people already have preconceived notions about this play. If they think it’s all comedy, they would be very wrong. Of course, comedy plays an important role, but by the end the audience will have ridden an emotional rollercoaster. As the play progresses, there are several twists and turns that will completely draw them in, one of which no-one will see coming.

Within the play: What is your favourite passage? What is the funniest passage, in your view? Which passage is the most thought-provoking for you?

Within the play: What is your favourite passage? What is the funniest passage, in your view? Which passage is the most thought-provoking for you?

This is quite difficult to answer. I tend to enjoy dialogue that makes people laugh the most. Having not yet had a full audience for the entire play, I can only go by what I think is funny. But my humour is not everyone’s taste. However, I’d say the opening joke is probably the funniest. There are many sections I enjoy the challenge of the acting and spectrum of emotions called for. There are also one or two parts in which I find uncomfortable parallels to my own life.

You have put on this show almost single-handedly: what have been the pros and cons?

You have put on this show almost single-handedly: what have been the pros and cons?

There have been quite a few pros and some expected and unexpected cons. The pros are primarily that there has been very little need to rely on others. This has meant no issues scheduling rehearsals around cast commitments, holidays, work, etc. It has also meant rehearsals whenever and wherever I wanted. The compact and static staging meant apartment rehearsals were fine. I started well in advance, which meant plenty of time to learn lines—even for me!😝 On the downside, I had to really push myself to learn lines! 🤣 And I’m responsible for my own motivation. The most unexpected con (though it shouldn’t have been) has been that running lines just once takes two non-stop hours. The most stress has been finding the small group of people required to run the theatre during performances. There are so many English-language productions on now that many people are already committed to or just finishing shows. Oh, and publicising a show with just one person is very difficult. This is the one instance when 20+ cast members would be bliss.

What expectations do you have of how audiences will react? Do you tailor your delivery to those expectations?

What expectations do you have of how audiences will react? Do you tailor your delivery to those expectations?

I recently read a review about the show that outlined the reactions of the audience. I thought it was perfect and I hope it will be similar for my audiences. Live audience feedback always plays a part in how actors’ performances feel to them. If there is no audience reaction, the actor feels a performance is flat (even though it may not be). If the reactions are good, the actor is given an ongoing confidence boost and, frequently, gives a better performance. There are opportunities for my audience to give vocal feedback, and the script calls for it. However, if they don’t, my response will be adapted as though they did. And, yes, I have no doubt that my responses will alter depending upon what the reactions are. However, the audience will react dramatically differently depending on where we are in the story.

What is the difference between being a stand-up comedian and portraying one?

What is the difference between being a stand-up comedian and portraying one?

I think most stand-up comedians are bricking it to some extent when they step on stage in front of an unknown audience. More so when they debut. You will see these elements in the show. Actors to varying degrees are also bricking it before stepping on stage. Although their audiences tend to be more ‘friendly’, there are still doubts about their performance, remembering lines, how the audience will react, whether it’s a disaster. If it goes badly, there's the inevitable depression. If it’s a success, the buzz is incredible. So, in summary, the stand-up comedian and the actor playing one are both bricking it, are both gluttons for punishment, and are both adrenaline addicts.

How do you relate to your character? Do you like him?

How do you relate to your character? Do you like him?

I am different to my character in all but a few things. Whilst he is likable, he does have some bad traits. However, it is easy for me to relate to the situations he finds himself in and empathise. Do I like him? I think he’d probably annoy me after a while. I mentioned previously that I can see myself more in another character involved in the story. I won’t say who, but I’m pretty sure my wife will know!

 

Teasers

NoName Theatre

Korkeavuorenkatu 17, 00130 Helsinki

Höyhentämo-Pluckhouse

 
NoName Theatre is The Finn-Brit Players' hidden basement studio theatre located directly opposite Johanneksenkirkko (St. John's Church) in the design district of Helsinki. Enter through the gateway for number 17 (it will be unlocked before the show). On your immediate left through the gate is the doorway to NoName. Please knock! You will be greeted and checked in.

Parking is limited to street parking only. Bus 24 and tram 10 stop outside the Design Museum (heading from the centre) and at Korkeavuorenkatu 11 (no.24) and Tarkk'ampujankatu 2 (no.10) heading toward the centre)

Wheelchair accessNoName Theatre is, unfortunately, very wheelchair unfriendly. There are numerous steps entering and within the theatre, and a downward flight of stairs to reach it. Whilst someone in a manual chair can access the theatre if they are carried down the entrance stairs in their chair, it is quite impossible to do so in electric chairs. We regret these restrictions, but are limited by the available facilities.

 

About Us

The Really Small Theatre Company was formed in Helsinki in 2005 with a view to staging small-scale, high-quality independent productions in a variety of venues. In January 2015, we became a registered association (rekisteröity yhdistys).

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Promoting contemporary drama in English in Helsinki

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  +358 (0)400 682596
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